The BSA Funding Hornet’s Nest

Earlier today I posted a Scouting-related tweet that provoked drew a strong reaction from several people. Here’s the tweet:

Intel Corporation: Pull your financial support until the Boy Scouts pull their anti-gay policy http://www.change.org/petitions/intel-corporation-pull-your-financial-support-until-the-boy-scouts-pull-their-anti-gay-policy … via @change

I was asked if I thought that it was better for Scouting to lose funds. I was asked how doing this would help the boys in Scouting. I was told that it was abusive and manipulative to use funding to try to effect change in Scouting’s policies over what is a relatively minor matter.

I am a former Boy Scout, my son is a Boy Scout, I have just been registered as an adult Scouter, and my daughter is looking at joining a Venture crew sometime in the next year. I think that Scouting is a fantastic youth program. So how can I support Scouts while calling for Intel to defund them?

I have two main reasons to support the petition to Intel.

Reason 1: Choices have consequences

The value of Scouting isn’t just the outdoor skills and learning how to handle yourself in the wilderness; it’s in the character formation that goes along with the outdoor program. Scouting teaches principles and duty. Scouting youth often drop out when they hit a certain age because of the peer pressure they’re getting by being different, by standing up for their beliefs and values. The kids who stay in Scouting learn that making a stand comes with consequences. It is precisely this kind of character formation that many former Scouts go on to say is the most valuable lesson they learn from Scouting.

The national Scouting organization has now said multiple times that they see having gay Scouts and Scouters as somehow being incompatible with Scouting ideals. Intel and the other companies identified in this article by Andy Birkey on The American Independent (linked to from the petition, BTW) have made their policies on charitable donations crystal clear. These policies are not new. These companies need to make sure their house is in order by verifying that their giving is in line with their policies (as the ones in orange have done). However, Scouting has a responsibility here too. By continuing to accept money from organizations such as Intel in violation of their stated donation guidelines, I believe that Scouting is sending the message that money is more important than principles. I’ve heard a lot of justification for accepting the money, but when it comes right down to it, taking donations from these companies when you don’t comply with their guidelines is hypocrisy, plain and simple. I think Scouting is better than that.

Whether I agree with the national organization’s stance on gay Scouts/Scouters or not, I think the unwritten message is doing more harm in the long run that the immediate defunding would do. I’m confident that should Scouting actually have the courage to turn down this money, alternate funding sources would quickly emerge in today’s polarized climate. Look at the Chik-Fil-A protests and responses if you doubt me. So no, I’m not worried that there would be long-term financial damage to Scouting.

It’s not like this is a theoretical situation for my family. Our local troop enjoys a high level of funding thanks to Microsoft matching contributions to the men and women who volunteer as our Scouters and committee members, many of whom are full-time Microsoft employees. I suspect that Microsoft’s policies are actually the same as Intel’s, based on their publicly stated policies for software donations to charities. If Microsoft were to stop funding Scouting (or Scouting were to stop taking Microsoft dollars because of this policy) our troop would be directly and severely affected.

I personally know at least two gay Scouters, and I suspect I know more. Scouting would somehow find the money to replace the lost donations. I don’t know how they’d replace the people I’m thinking of.

I’ve talked this over with my son on multiple occasions. When we discussed this particular petition and the fact that I was going to publicly support it, we talked about the implications. I asked him if he had any concerns. His response: “Do it, Dad. Scouting needs a kick in the ass.” (Yes, he’s my kid.)

And if you think I’m somehow being abusive or manipulative for supporting the use of defunding as a tool for policy change, go back to that Birkey article:

In a brief filed in the landmark case of Boy Scouts of America v. Dale, a lawyer for the LDS Church warned that the church would leave the scouts if gays were allowed to be scout leaders.

“If the appointment of scout leaders cannot be limited to those who live and affirm the sexual standards of BSA and its religious sponsors, the Scouting Movement as now constituted will cease to exist,” wrote Von G. Keetch on behalf of the LDS Church and several other religious organizations in 2000. “The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints — the largest single sponsor of Scouting units in the United States — would withdraw from Scouting if it were compelled to accept openly homosexual Scout leaders.”

According to the Chartered Organizations and the Boy Scouts of America fact sheet, as of December 31, 2011 there are over 100,000 chartered Scouting units, with nearly 7/10 of them chartered by religious organizations. In the tables in that fact sheet, we see data on the top 25 religious charterers, top 20 civic charterers, and the educational charterers – giving us data on 55,100 units (just over half) and 1,031,240 youth. According to this data, the LDS Church sponsors almost 35% of the Scouting units in the BSA. Yet, according to this same data, they have only 16% of the actual youth in Scouting. The youth-to-unit average for the LDS Church is a mere 11.1, which is the lowest of any organization (or group of organizations) listed in the fact sheet data.

Several of the organizations on that list, including the next largest religious sponsor (the United Methodist Church – 11,078 units, 371,491 youth, 33.5 youth per unit, 10% of the total units, and 14% of the total youth) would support and welcome gay Scouts and Scouters. The LDS Church gets to be vocal about it because of that 1/3 number of units – that translates into money for Scouting. This kind of ultimatum is in fact what manipulative behavior (using the threat of defunding) looks like.

Reason 2: People who see a problem need to be part of the solution

I’m continuing to get more involved with Scouting for one simple reason: I believe that if I see something I think is wrong, I need to be part of the solution. I don’t think it’s right that Scouting be in a position where it can have its cake and eat it too. However, I’m not going to throw the baby out with the bathwater; I see the incredible value the Scouting program gives to young men (and the young women who participate in the Venturer program).

My own religious beliefs and principles move me to be more involved precisely because I think Scouting needs more Scouts and Scouters who are open about their support for changing these policies. I know people who gave up on Scouting; I refuse to be one of them.

I want Scouting to change its policies, but I’m willing to keep being a part of it during those changes. I’m not trying to take my bat and ball and go home if the game doesn’t go my way. I want Scouts to continue producing young people of character for future generations.

Want to see the data I’m looking at? I got the fact sheet from the link stated above, brought the data in Excel, and added formulas for unit/youth ratios and percentages. I’ve put this spreadsheet online publicly via SkyDrive.

1 Comment

  1. Alice Goodman

    Great research and not just knee-jerk reaction. Bravo! As I told Stephanie recently, I support Aleric’s involvement in BSA but in no way will I support BSA as long as they adhere to their homophobic stance. I personally know the value of Scouting in someone’s life. I am a life-long Girl Scout.

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